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You may remember that I linked to this mega-adorable rocking sheep way back in my first nursery post of this series. In my follow-up post, I boldly declared my intention to attempt to make my own rocking sheep out of an old rocking horse and an Ikea sheepskin. But I’ll confess, I didn’t really have a plan beyond buying a sheepskin last time I made an Ikea run. Then, last week, I found a rocking horse on Craigslist (I wasn’t joking about being addicted to it!), so it seemed it was time.Vintage Rocking Horse and Chalk PaintAfter doing some research, I decided to paint the body of the horse with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. I was intrigued by the claims that you don’t have to strip, sand, or prime furniture before painting, and that you’re left with a matte finish free of brushstrokes. I will admit I was a little skeptical, but this paint is kind of magical. I slapped it on to the beat up, varnished wooden rocking horse, and two coats later I was left with this lovely charcoal grey fella. He looked so nice I was tempted to leave him as-is, but the sheepskin beckoned so I powered on.Rocking horse painted with Annie Sloan Chalk PaintFor the next step, I gathered my supplies: a roll of wax paper, a utility knife, scissors, a pen, a hot glue gun and plenty of glue sticks, and one Ikea sheepskin. It’s easy to see why these cuddly skins are so popular with designers (Emily Henderson just listed them as one of her all-time styling essentials), they are so thick and soft. If real sheepskin isn’t your style, they also come in a faux version that looks great.

Creating template for rocking horseI’ll admit that I was kind of winging it at this point, I used wax paper to cut out a rough template and then the utility knife to carefully cut through the back of the sheepskin. Don’t use scissors for this, or you will cut  the fur and lose some of the natural fluffiness that will help you disguise your seams. Save your scraps to fill in blank spots or to create coverings for the sheeps “legs”.Creating templates for rocking horseOnce your main sheepskin pieces are cut out and you’ve checked to see that they fit your rocking horse well, it’s time to plug in your glue gun and start gluing. I started with the back of the horse and worked in small sections, wrapping the sheepskin around the edges as I went.Use your scraps to fill in any blank spots and trim excess fur with the utility knife.Gluing Sheepskin to Rocking HorseAnd after a couple of afternoons of work, it was finally time to unveil the finished product. Even though I make things for a living, I really didn’t know how or if this project would turn out, but I think you’ll agree that it. looks. amazing. Plush and cuddly and right at home in my vintage-meets-modern nursery. I am over the moon!
Rocking Horse turned into a Rocking Sheep
It felt great to get this project checked off my shrinking to-do list. Not bad for a $6 rocking horse, eh?

Revisit past editions of The Nursery Files:

16 Responses

  1. Thanks, guys! I am glad you love this project as much as I do. He is just delightful.

  2. Briana@HGTV says:

    Crazy good! I am still so impressed by this. :) <3

  3. [...] project for ye olde nursery. I’ve been plugging away, making art for the walls and even a Rocking Sheep, but this week my energy was focused on making an inexpensive-yet-adorable mobile for Baby [...]

  4. [...] How to Turn a Rocking Horse Into a Rocking Sheep [...]

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Marianne CanadaMarianne is the Special Projects Editor for HGTV.com. She was the girl in college who saved her waitressing tips to buy a Knoll chair and the perfect vintage couch. All...

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