Jessica Yonker

"Now you're just some flokati that I used to know."

Jessica Yonker is a writer for HGTV.com and a professional glitter handler in training. She loves decorating her friends' homes without their permission and practicing for her inevitable appearance on Chopped. Like her mother, she's obsessed with lamps, mirrors and microfiber throws. Unlike her mother, she has an unexplained aversion to chalkboard paint.

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POSTS BY Jessica Yonker

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Happy National Cereal Day! There’s bound to be a lot of milk-related incidents today, and this funky bowl by Fred & Friends takes the idea of crying over spilled milk to new heights.

Help Design Happens celebrate National Cereal Day with this funky cereal bowl by Fred and Friends.

from Fred & Friends

The Spilt Milk bowl is made from flexible silicone, making it virtually impossible for small hands to break. Now if only it could defend against the kids dumping half a gallon of milk all over the counter, it’d be perfect.

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We love music in my household. In fact, my roommates and I have a speaker in just about every room of the house. They help us power through our chores whether it’s tackling piles of laundry, scrubbing the tub or vacuuming – we do a lot of vacuuming.

Spend more time dancing and less time dusting with Design Happen's spring cleaning playlist.

With March finally underway, I want to kick off spring cleaning season by sharing a couple of playlists to help you breeze through your household tasks. Categorized by cleaning mood with everything from today’s pop hits to ‘80s power ballads, you’re sure to find something to get you motivated.

You can listen to the entire mix here, or read on for the individual playlists.

More House Cleaning Music

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We’re expecting a few new little faces at HGTV headquarters, so it’s no surprise the Design Happens crew has caught a severe case of baby fever. Don’t get me wrong. I’m just as baby crazy as everyone else around here, but there is something else I’ve been fawning over lately: terrariums.

We're still loving terrariums at HGTV's Design Happens.Propeller Vine / Butterfly Aquarium 
Ornaments / Pear Air Plants / Hanging Score & Solder

I could look at terrariums all day. And with no foreseeable end to winter, thanks to our crazy Tennessee weather, I plan to make a terrarium of my own to put some life back into my home while I wait for spring.

Learn how to make your own terrarium in less than 20 minutes >> 

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A headboard is your ultimate chance to make a statement, but it can run you hundreds of dollars if you buy one brand new. Luckily, you can make a headboard out of practically anything. Just take Kara Paslay, who loved the look of a Moroccan-style headboard from West Elm. However, she didn’t love the price so she made her own out of – yep, you guessed it – doormats.

Find out what this stunning headboard is made out of and get instructions on making your own on HGTV.com's blog, Design Happens.

Get the full instructions >>

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Winter is undeniably one of my favorite seasons, but I’ve checked out early this year. In an attempt to coax spring into coming early, I’ve started the long and grueling process of cleaning my house.

Whether it’s deep cleaning or just tidying up, there are a few ways to go the extra mile and keep your home sparkling. During my spree, I uncovered dirty items around my home that I didn’t even realize were in need of my care. I cannot confirm or deny that I spent 30 minutes vacuuming a loveseat.

Get a head start on your spring cleaning with these deep cleaning tips from HGTV.com's blog, Design Happens.

1. The upholstery. Vacuum couches, chairs, love seats, rugs and mattresses, then spot clean with a rag and warm water. Depending on the fabric, curtains and slipcovers can be tossed in the washing machine.

2. The walls. If you have kids or pets, this might be a no-brainer – those handprints (or pawprints!) add up. Wipe off any loose dust with a soft cloth, then gently scrub off any dirt with an all-purpose cleaner safe for your walls. (Test in an inconspicuous area first if you’re unsure.) Don’t forget the molding!

Clean Deeper

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If you’ve been following closely, you know that I moved into an old house at the beginning of the year. Since then, I’ve been working to collect pieces to make my cozy cottage feel even homier. You can imagine my excitement when I discovered this super cute wooden state sign on Pinterest.

The Pine Nuts offers all states and has a selection of other fun shapes in 12 vibrant colors. Don’t see anything you like? No worries – The Pine Nuts takes custom orders, so you can be as imaginative as you want!

I’ll take one of each, please.

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Achoo! A couple of us down at HGTV Headquarters aren’t feeling so well. I spent last week in bed fighting what I’m convinced was the plague, armed with only a stash of home remedies and a few boxes of tea.

Unless you’re one of the lucky ones that never seem to get sick, you’re bound to catch a cold sometime. Keeping your home spic and span is one of the most important ways to ward away disease, and a thorough cleaning once you’re feeling better can prevent illness from spreading to your loved ones.

7 Ways to Keep Your Home Germ-Free: Cleaning your home after an illness will reduce the risk for spreading disease to family and friends.

Start with the air. If you don’t remember the last time you changed the AC filter in your home, you’re cheating yourself out of good health. Harmful airborne particles like smoke, bacteria, pet dander, mold and allergens can build up in your home with a dirty filter.  A quality pleated filter will only run you about $20 and last for 90 days.

Take off your shoes. Your shoes are a breeding ground for bacteria. Millions of harmful microorganisms can be tracked across the floor – a major problem only multiplied if you have kids that like to play on the floor. Take your shoes off at the door and politely ask guests to do the same.

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The spice cabinet is by far my favorite part of the kitchen. The aroma of cinnamon and red peppers, the endless flavor combinations waiting to be discovered . . . I could go on for days.

DIY spice jars

Perhaps you remember all the great ways you can use vinegar around your home. You’ll quickly find that herbs and spices are no different, offering natural solutions for both you and your home. Plus, it’s likely you already have several of these super-spices at home – probably more than you know what to do with – making them a practically free cure-all.

The Spices

Cayenne Pepper: An easy to grow hot pepper great for adding a kick to any dish, cayenne pepper is a powerful sinus-cleanser (as many hot-sauce aficionados may know) and also great for getting rid of pests.

Cinnamon: One of the most commonly used spices, cinnamon smells good and is good for you.

Garlic: Garlic isn’t actually an herb or a spice, but a member of the lily family – making it kin to other bulbs like onions, shallots and chives. Besides its numerous uses in the kitchen, garlic can do everything from clear up acne to protect your pet from parasites.

Ginger: Ginger root has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes such as treating digestive problems or a nasty cold.

Ginseng: Like ginger, ginseng is harvested for its healing properties and can also help you feel more energetic.

Mint: The mint family actually covers a wide range of plants that includes basil, rosemary, oregano, thyme and sage. Mint is versatile and used in cleansers, can deter pests and can also soothe a tooth or tummy ache.

Other beneficial spices include – but certainly aren’t limited to – turmeric, parsley, saffron, nutmeg, cloves and countless others.

Tricks to Try

Latest Pins on Pinterest

  • That's a wrap for our Kitchen and Bath Hour. If you love

  • Designer Sarah Richardson placed two large wicker baskets

  • Freestanding storage is a great option if you frequently

  • To really maximize the storage in your kitchen, put unused