ALL POSTS IN Gardening

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I lack a green thumb and I’m not embarrassed to admit it. I just didn’t get the know-how or special touch when it comes to gardening. But there are some projects even I can’t possibly mess up. This gorgeous, spring-y living wreath designed by Kim Foren is one of them. It looks complicated, but it’s not! All you need are a few supplies and you’re all set.

How to Make a Living Wreath From HGTV's Design BlogPhoto by Erica Ann Photography and Fine Art

Materials: 3-D wire wreath ring, potting soil, plants with 3-inch roots (succulents, pansies, annuals) and sphagnum moss

Directions: First, soak the potting soil and moss in water. Line the inside of the wreath with moss, then fill with soil. Plant your plants around the wreath. Pat down to secure. Water and lay flat for at least one week. After a week, hang your wreath or use as an eye-catching green centerpiece.

Get the Full Step-by-Step Instructions >>

More Seasonal Wreath Ideas:

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You’ve seen beautiful photos of our HGTV.com editorial staff’s gardens, but I bet you’re wondering whatever happened to those terrariums and herb gardens I’ve been rambling about.

There’s good news and bad news. The bad news is I discovered the cat had been using my seedlings as his own personal obstacle course:

Your four-legged friends are often the culprit of soil problems in the garden.

The good news is I started fresh (okay, I cheated and bought plants at a greenhouse) and can finally share my garden with you. Enjoy!

Peek into one of our HGTV.com editor's colorful array of container gardens and terrariums.

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We’ve been wishing, hoping and practically pleading with Mother Nature and now the day is here: it’s officially spring! And what better way to celebrate than by growing your own Easter basket grass?

Toss the fake, store-bought grass and try growing real grass in your Easter basket this spring. Get instructions from HGTV.com's blog, Design Happens.

If you start now, you’ll have a good-sized patch of grass within a few days. Kind of makes you wonder why you ever bothered with the fake stuff, right?

Get the full growing instructions>>

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As kids, Marianne and I would have made an odd St. Patrick’s Day duo. While you’d likely find her scrambling to find something green to avoid getting pinched, I spent many a March 17 outside searching for four-leaf clovers and chasing rainbows. That leprechaun’s pot of gold was as good as mine.

Four-leaf clovers proved hard to come by and I was only allowed to follow the rainbow to the end of the street, so as you can imagine I never found the gold. But that’s okay – this year I’m bringing that pesky leprechaun to me with this easy shamrock garden.

Get ready for St. Patrick's Day with a shamrock garden centerpiece.

Learn how to make your own leprechaun garden at HGTVGardens.com >>

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After spending early March enduring not only freezing temperatures but also out-of-the-ordinary snow, Knoxville finally saw its first bit of spring weather this weekend. While it’s still a little chilly out, the sunny skies were just what many of us needed to get started on outdoor projects.

The nice weather inspired me to pick up a couple of seed packets and give my poor roommates a break from all our spring cleaning duties. We started a couple of flowers and spring veggies, but I’m most excited for our soon-to-be kitchen herb garden.

Get advice on starting an indoor herb garden for your kitchen or windowsill from HGTV.com's blog, Design Happens.
Growing an herb garden indoors isn’t difficult as long as you know what to plant. Herbs like mint and oregano can tolerate low-light conditions and are easily grown from seed, but herbs like basil and thyme require more sunlight and care to thrive.

Ready to get growing? Get full planting instructions right here.

What are you itching to grow this spring? 

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Believe it or not, we’re almost halfway through the month of March. Can you believe it?! That means spring is right around the corner and beautiful flowers are going to start popping up left and right. I’m constantly intrigued (and a bit jealous) of everyone’s gardens. I mean, I live in an apartment where my “garden” consists of a few houseplants and one unknown container of soil on the patio. As a future gardener, I’m constantly searching for tips and ideas. One of my favorite places to seek advice is from our newest sister site, HGTVGardens.com.

Share photos of your plants, flowers, garden and outdoor spaces by joining the HGTV Gardens community. After you join, you’ll be prompted to add a photo of yourself, write a short bio and set your location (this will help determine your gardening zone). After that, you can start uploading images, creating photo albums and writing captions. You can make your albums public or private. I suggest making them public so we can all gawk over your fabulous garden. Go ahead and get started by creating an HGTV Gardens profile.

In the meantime, check out some garden photos from the HGTV.com editorial team.

Passion Flower on HGTVGardens.comPassion flower in Leanne Potts’ garden

Leanne Potts, vice president of editorial, has uploaded pictures of everything from marigolds to cacti. She even includes some plant finds from a recent trip to Santa Fe, NM.

Explore Leanne’s garden at HGTVGardens.com. >> 

Purple Crocuses on HGTVGardens.comPurple crocuses in Liz Gray’s garden

HGTV.com senior editor and Design Happens blogger, Liz Gray, is a self-proclaimed “novice gardener and farmers’ market lover.” If you’ve been following Liz’s series, House Diaries, then you know she recently moved into a home that has provided quite a few surprises, both inside and outside. One of the best things that came with her 1950s home? The daffodils, lilies and crocuses that bloom in the spring.

Explore Liz’s garden at HGTVGardens.com. >>

More Garden Photos From HGTV.com Editors

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You may already know this, but we’re in love with carrot this month. So in honor of Plant a Flower Day, we rounded up our favorite orange perennials that you can plant right now for vibrant summer blooms.

See our favorite orange flowers and get planting instructions from HGTV.com's blog, Design Happens. Blackberry Lily / Mum / Klondyke Azalea
Dwarf Red Hot Poker / Dahlia / Blanket Flower /Pansy / Juila Child Rose

Happy planting! Visit the links below to get more information on each of these lively varieties: 
Blackberry Lily
Mums
Klondyke Azalea
Red Hot Poker Lily
Dahlia
Blanket Flower
Pansy
Rose

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We’re expecting a few new little faces at HGTV headquarters, so it’s no surprise the Design Happens crew has caught a severe case of baby fever. Don’t get me wrong. I’m just as baby crazy as everyone else around here, but there is something else I’ve been fawning over lately: terrariums.

We're still loving terrariums at HGTV's Design Happens.Propeller Vine / Butterfly Aquarium 
Ornaments / Pear Air Plants / Hanging Score & Solder

I could look at terrariums all day. And with no foreseeable end to winter, thanks to our crazy Tennessee weather, I plan to make a terrarium of my own to put some life back into my home while I wait for spring.

Learn how to make your own terrarium in less than 20 minutes >> 

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Have you seen the new HGTVGardens site? It’s a proud new addition to our family — and let me tell you — it’s pretty amazing. It has all you need to know about getting started with gardening and goes way beyond that.

Spring Gardening

I like to start out with the user-friendly plant finder, which has a list of thousands of varieties. The plants are conveniently organized alphabetically, but not sure which plant you want? No problem — you can search by zone and type, and each plant is listed with recommended light and moisture levels.

HGTV Gardens Plant Finder Tool

Explore More of HGTVGardens.com

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Either I’ve been inspired by the new HGTV Gardens website, or I know that spring is just around the corner (March 20!), or maybe it’s both — but, I can’t get enough of outdoorsy talk. Plants, flowers, gardens, warmer temps, beach vacations, whatever — bring it!

I noticed this week while perusing Pinterest that my fellow blogger Jessica pinned this photo below. This is a craft project from Dilly-Dali Art that you can do with your kiddos that will be fun for them and you, and the end result will be a stunning pot to use for your spring flowers.

Do you have spring fever, yet?

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If you haven’t heard (where have you been?), HGTV Gardens launched yesterday with a new website. It’s all anyone in the office can talk about (it’s that good!). And so, I’ve been flipping through the site all morning — and look what I’ve come across. This three-room treehouse strung together with wooden bridges is a secret hideaway in the middle of Atlanta’s Buckhead neighborhood. Fascinating, right?

It sort of reminds me of the hugely popular Hobbit Houses post I did back in December.

Tree House in the City

A House on High: Image courtesy of Ben Rollins

Treehouse Inside: Look at the Stunning Interiors >>

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The spice cabinet is by far my favorite part of the kitchen. The aroma of cinnamon and red peppers, the endless flavor combinations waiting to be discovered . . . I could go on for days.

DIY spice jars

Perhaps you remember all the great ways you can use vinegar around your home. You’ll quickly find that herbs and spices are no different, offering natural solutions for both you and your home. Plus, it’s likely you already have several of these super-spices at home – probably more than you know what to do with – making them a practically free cure-all.

The Spices

Cayenne Pepper: An easy to grow hot pepper great for adding a kick to any dish, cayenne pepper is a powerful sinus-cleanser (as many hot-sauce aficionados may know) and also great for getting rid of pests.

Cinnamon: One of the most commonly used spices, cinnamon smells good and is good for you.

Garlic: Garlic isn’t actually an herb or a spice, but a member of the lily family – making it kin to other bulbs like onions, shallots and chives. Besides its numerous uses in the kitchen, garlic can do everything from clear up acne to protect your pet from parasites.

Ginger: Ginger root has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes such as treating digestive problems or a nasty cold.

Ginseng: Like ginger, ginseng is harvested for its healing properties and can also help you feel more energetic.

Mint: The mint family actually covers a wide range of plants that includes basil, rosemary, oregano, thyme and sage. Mint is versatile and used in cleansers, can deter pests and can also soothe a tooth or tummy ache.

Other beneficial spices include – but certainly aren’t limited to – turmeric, parsley, saffron, nutmeg, cloves and countless others.

Tricks to Try

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This vintage storefront greenhouse comes complete with reclaimed windows, wood flooring and a wood back wall. Each window is latched with a barrel bolt and the windows all have box supports to hold them open for ventilation.

Greenhouse

Etsy User :: Schuan Carpenter

Each greenhouse is unique. Designs are not finalized until materials have been procured. The final design is based on what materials are available at the time of purchase.

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The heat of summer can be overwhelming. When temperatures soar into the 100′s, the last thing you want is a warm glass of red wine or a heavy beer. You need to cool off with a fresh, minty treat – a mojito. This simple drink screams summer and is the perfect accessory to relax with by the pool (or on the driveway, on the beach, in a fancy restaurant – it’s very versatile!).

Classic Mojito RecipeClassic Mojitos

Once you’ve made your simple syrup, mix in rum, lime juice and soda water. Head to your garden (or grocery store) for a few sprigs of mint and you have the perfect warm weather refreshment.

Happy Hour Cocktails: The Full Collection

If you prefer to cool off without alcohol, then this mocktail needs to be added to your beverage rotation. The fresh taste of grapefruit paired with mint is a taste that’s not to be missed.

Virgin Grapefruit MojitoVirgin Grapefruit Mojito

So raise your glass to summer and say cheers to mojitos!

Find more great mojito recipes on Food.com.

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If you’ve browsed around HGTV.com, then you have certainly come across Designers’ Portfolio. This area of the website houses thousands of images from designers all over the world who feature their high-end commercial and residential designs. It’s a place for you to seek inspiration and ideas for your home, both inside and out. Well, we decided to take this idea a bit further. Now, you can seek ideas and inspiration on flowers, landscaping, edible plants, water features and much more with HGTV.com’s brand-new Garden Galleries. Are you wanting to create an Asian-style garden, or maybe add climbers to the back of your home? Garden Galleries has just what you’re looking for.

First, you can browse by category: landscaping, outdoor retreat, flowers and foliage, water features and edible. Then, you can narrow those results even further by choosing one of 18 design styles. And if you’re looking for a particular color, you can search that way as well. Dive in and take a look.

hgtv garden galleries pictures of flowersClimbing Rose

READ MORE

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What is the history of bottle trees? Best I can tell (don’t quote me on this), their origin dates back hundreds of years. Evidently, it was believed that evil spirits would be drawn to the shiny bottles and become trapped inside. Folks would place bottles on trees around their home to keep evil from getting in the house.

Now, I don’t know about all that — but, I do know that today they are used as decorative art in gardens and landscaping. BottleTree.com has made having one super easy. They provide the “tree” and colorful bottles and ship everything straight to your house. They’re both stunning and unique.

Bottle Tree

Do you know more about bottle trees? Tell me below. And, let me know if you actually have one of these “evil catchers.”

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Until now, I didn’t think there was a nice way to seamlessly incorporate a label into your garden. But take a look at these vegetable-inspired rock markers by Repeat Crafter Me. I have to admit they’re pretty adorable.

Vegetable Garden Labels

I like the idea of re-purposing rocks and using supplies you’ve probably already got on hand to create labels for your vegetables. They would even make a great indoor project to try with your kids on a steamy day like today.

What vegetables are you growing this summer?

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My mother taught me never to boast. “No one wants to hear all of that,” she’d say. Well, Mom, look away, because I’m about to brag.

Everyone, look at my hydrangeas! Yes, they’re mine! If you know me, you know what a triumph this is. Finally, after years of heartache and struggle, I, Grant Dudley, have had hydrangea success!

Hydrangeas

The prettiest of all the blooms.

Hydrangeas

Yes, this is real. I didn’t doctor the photo.

Hydrangeas

New blooms are popping up daily!

I’ll tell you the truth, these plants are a sight for my sore eyes. I have been plagued with ugly, sickly and distressed hydrangeas for at least four years now.

“What made the difference this year?” you say. Well, I’m glad you asked.

Intervention. Yes, plain and simple intervention. This spring I stayed on top of the plants before they could take a nasty turn. I watered them faithfully (with a little vinegar here and there), pruned back the branches, pulled off questionable leaves and most importantly, treated the bushes with a fungicide (I now know a fungus has been the problem all along).

So, today, on this first day of summer, I proudly write here and say “Take that ugly hydrangeas!” There’s a new sheriff in town.

Have you ever turned a dud of a plant or flower into a blooming beauty? Let me know!

Oh, and I’m sorry Mom.

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No, this isn’t some sort of man-eating plant. And it isn’t a xylophone either. It’s actually an experimental moss garden designed by asensio_mah and students from the Harvard Graduate School of Design for the Canada Blooms show in Toronto.

 Interactive Garden

Participants got down and dirty by unwrapping and twisting the garden’s wall to create various-sized garden pockets (or microclimates) to see how they grow in different environments. I usually can’t keep plants alive, so I could really use this wall to “hide” all the sad plants I end up with. Would that be considered cheating?

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