ALL POSTS TAGGED "Antiques"

  • Tell Your Friends

If you saw Liz’s decorating trends post you know that she and I recently spent several (blissful!) days taking in all that’s new and notable in furniture, accessories, lighting, fabrics and more in High Point, NC at the world’s largest furniture industry trade show — or as I like to refer to it: Disney for Designers.

While I certainly enjoy checking out the trendiest fabrics and finishes, the highlight of each Market visit for me is spending a few hours strolling thru the Market’s Antique & Design Center. Here, 60+ premiere antique dealers showcase centuries-old European rarities, architectural salvage, mid-century pieces and funky vintage finds.

Antiques have always been a go-to for interior designers but with each passing Market, the collected-over-time look is being realistically reproduced by more and more manufacturers. Although most of the items I point out below are available to-the-trade-only, meaning you have to go through an interior designer or dealer to buy them (sorry!), they’re just a few of the trending antique styles that caught my eye. So, the good news is, if you love antiques, like I do, they’re super hot in the design world right now — whatever type of vintage items you prefer, display them proudly!

Vive la France: French-inspired antiques have been the design world’s darling for quite a while and they’re not ready to raise the white flag yet. I spied all the Louis (13-16) plus several Empire and Rococo gems at Market. Below is a reproduction Louis 16 (or XVI, if you prefer, AKA the same Louis who lost his head alongside Marie Antoinette) gilt settee from Eloquence. They’ve done a fantastic job replicating the handcarved details, even subtly distressing the gilt finish so this new piece looks as if it might have been found at Versailles:
antique french furniture from Eloquence

Aged to Perfection: Weathered finishes are also nothing new and I spied plenty of legitimately timeworn finishes, like the salvaged wooden pediment on the left at Design Legacy alongside new pieces, like the bistro chairs and zinc-topped table at Dovetail, that have been distressed to look like they’ve spent decades outdoors:
antiqued furniture at high point market

3 More Antique Trends to Watch

  • Tell Your Friends

Wow, that was some kind of crazy winter, right?! For those of you still suffering through the winter that just won’t die — my humblest apologies — but for those of us in warmer climes: Yay, spring’s here! And, for me, the arrival of spring means it’s time to head outside, scissors in hand, to find any early bloomers that I can bring inside to brighten things up.

First to flower in my backyard is hellebore  (a.k.a. lenten rose). Their heavy, droopy blooms on short stems are best displayed in a vase with a small opening. Here, I have them in what looks like an expensive Wedgwood vase but it’s actually an old Avon bottle that I found at an estate sale for the irresistible price of … wait for it … 10 cents!: Spring Hellebores in an Old Blue Vase

Joining the hellebore in their winter-banishing crusade are tiny, delicate crocus placed in an antique salt shaker:
Spring Flowers on a Bedroom Nightstand

The cardinals that have reigned unchallenged in my backyard this winter have been joined by a variety of other birds, including robins. I love the idea of using bird’s nests as a spring decoration but would never want to deprive some poor bird of their handmade home so I simply DIY-ed my own bird’s nest complete with tiny robin’s eggs. You can make one too while watching your favorite show. Get crafting with my step-by-step instructions>> How to Make a DIY Bird's Nest for Spring

You can make your nest any size you like — even big enough to act as an Easter basket: Handmade Bird's Nest as an Easter Basket

This is also the perfect time of year to force a branch to bloom indoors. Good candidates for this include fothergilla, witch hazel, Bradford pear, cherry, quince, redbud, lilac and my favorite: forsythia. Here’s what the forsythia branches in my backyard looked like when I cut them; the buds were just beginning to swell: Forsythia Branches Just Breaking Into Bud

And here they are just 1 week later, adding a happy shot of color to my living room:Cut Forced Forsythia as a Spring Arrangement

 Are you as ready for warmer weather as I am? How will you spring-up your rooms?

  • Tell Your Friends

So, have I mentioned lately that I love my job? No? Well, I do! I recently spent a few (blissful!) days in Charleston, SC touring historic homes and checking out their prestigious annual antiques show. I shared a few of my favorite antique finds last week; here are a few more goodies:

I’m obsessed with gilding — shiny gold objects draw me to them like a magnet. Gilding is the process of covering a surface, typically porcelain, wood or metal, with a thin layer of gold. Also known as gilt, gold-leaf and ormolu (from the French or moulu, literally ground gold) this technique is centuries old – early examples decorated the homes of Greek, Chinese and Egytian elite. Left: The mirror in the foreground is one of a pair of George the Third, English Regency mirrors from the early 1800′s  – $17,500. G. Sergeant Antiques To demonstrate the (top notch!) quality of antiques offered for sale at this show, the mirror in the background is the mate to one on display at NY’s Metropolitan Museum of Art — wow! Right: The massive horse’s head is a French trade sign from 1870. The gilding was applied over cast lead and is in amazing condition considering this piece would have been displayed outside a business and spent decades exposed to the elements – $4,500. Cunha St. John Antiques
Antique gold mirror and horse's head at Charleston Antiques Show

Storage that’s both practical and beautiful is not a new idea. Left: What looks like a really tall hat box is actually a cheese keeper. Refrigeration is a technology we take for granted but 100+ years ago, this beautifully embellished pottery dome prevented cheese from drying out while keeping it cool and mold-free, circa  1875 — $9,500 Jerry S. Hayes MajolicaRight: For centuries tea was a luxury that only European, and later Amercan, elite could afford. To protect their stash from rodents or light-fingered servants, small locked boxes were used. Soon, the boxes that held the precious tea became a status symbol in themselves employing exotic and rare materials like ivory and tortoiseshell. English tea caddy, circa 1830 — $5,300 Sallea Antiques
Antique majolica and tortoiseshell tea caddy at Charleston Antiques Show

My two pups are the center of my world and judging from the high number of antiques I spied featuring man’s best friend, dogs have long been considered members of the family. Left: This sweet pencil sketch of greyhounds by artist Felix O.C. Darley may have been a study for one of the many books he illustrated. Darley was one of the 19th century’s top illustrators; his work helped classics by Dickens, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Washington Irving and Edgar Allen Poe (to name a few) come to life — $750, American Eagle Antiques (no website). Right: A pair of skillfully carved mahogany whippets support a Carrara marble top on this Neapolitan console which was crafted in Italy, circa 1820 — $46,000 from Yew Tree House Antiques.Antique pencil sketch and wood furniture at Charleston Antiques Show

*Check back next Wednesday to see some of the amazing private homes and gardens I toured in Charleston.

MORE ADVENTURES IN ANTIQUING:
Adventures in Antiquing: Charleston Antiques Show Part 1
Adventures in Antiquing: (Easy!) Beachy Candle Makeover
Adventures in Antiquing: Repurposed Wooden Tray
Adventures in Antiquing: Crushing On Carrara Marble
Adventures in Antiquing: Old Toolbox Turned Magazine Caddy
Adventures in Antiquing: Old Clock Repurposed as a Frame
Adventures in Antiquing: Classical Busts
Adventures in Antiquing: Vintage Avon Bottle
Adventures in Antiquing: Salvaged Molding As Holiday Decor

  • Tell Your Friends

:Sigh: Charleston — my dream city! I must have lived there in some previous (and terribly glamorous) former life because I feel absolutely at home whenever I visit. The nice folks at the Historic Charleston Foundation invited me down to check out their 10th annual antiques show and peek inside a few of the city’s (amazing!) historic homes and gardens and I couldn’t get my car packed up quickly enough.

One of the nation’s premiere antique events, only select dealers are invited to show each spring in Charleston; independent auditors screen each item before it’s offered for sale to guarantee authenticity and provenance — so, none of my bargain-basement finds here. I’ll share more antiques plus some pics from my home and garden tours later but here are a few of the pieces that caught my eye:

Named for Sweden’s King Gustav III, Gustavian furniture features Neoclassical (Greco/Roman) details and a decidedly French flair — Gustav was a frequent visitor to the French palace of Versailles and modeled his court’s style after the pieces he saw there. Unlike French furniture of the period which was often gilded or shellacked, the Swedish craftsmen continued to paint their pieces in matte, pastel shades — creating the signature look that’s so desirable today. Below:  “Mora” tall case clock, circa 1800 — $8,600 and 1 of a set of 6 hand-carved chairs, signed Sven Anderson — $12,000. All available from Dawn Hill Antiques  Antique Swedish furniture at Charleston Antiques Show

I spied this Queen Anne chest-on-stand from a distance and had to get closer for a better look. It’s gorgeous, don’t you think? The wood is in amazing condition — especially considering this English piece (circa 1710) is over 300 years old. That’s right, this dresser is older than our country. Check out the fanciful arched detail on the skirt — beautiful! — $18,000. Available from Jayne Thompson Antiques Antique wood furniture at Charleston Antiques Show

Although most of the items at the Charleston Antiques Show were centuries old and European, there were a few early 20th century American gems like this charming carved bulldog head that opens up to reveal a brass-lined humidor so a Victorian gentleman could stash his cigars within easy reach — $1,900. A Bird in Hand Antiques Antique tobacco storage at Charleston Antiques Show

 *Check back next Wednesday for more of my trip to Charleston.

MORE ADVENTURES IN ANTIQUING:
Adventures in Antiquing: (Easy!) Beachy Candle Makeover
Adventures in Antiquing: Repurposed Wooden Tray
Adventures in Antiquing: Crushing On Carrara Marble
Adventures in Antiquing: Old Toolbox Turned Magazine Caddy
Adventures in Antiquing: Old Clock Repurposed as a Frame
Adventures in Antiquing: Classical Busts
Adventures in Antiquing: Vintage Avon Bottle
Adventures in Antiquing: Salvaged Molding As Holiday Decor

  • Tell Your Friends

The HGTV.com team recently visited High Point Furniture Market to rub elbows with the design world’s movers-and-shakers and take the pulse of what’s to come. After several days of (blissful!) interior design saturation, I can tell you beyond a shadow of a doubt that antiques are HOT! Think mid-day-sun-baking-asphalt-in-the-middle-of-the-Mojave-desert hot. To capitalize on the trend, most showrooms had a curated, collected-over-time look that mixed their newly-manufactured products with a few vintage-inspired pieces.

Traditional furniture and accessories have always been a Market mainstay. Reproductions of everything from heavily ornamented Louis XVI settees to pale Gustavian commodes have never really gone out of style; but at this Market they were joined by the real deal: centuries-old case goods, lighting, classical sculpture, architectural salvage and quirky, one-of-a-kind accessories.

Here are just a few of the goodies I spied at Market; unfortunately, most of these gems are available only to the trade so I couldn’t include links — hit local antique shops or online sites like V&M, 1stdibs or Ruby Lane to search for similar items.

Antiques at High Point Furniture Market*burled wood chest: Luisana Designs  *early American ship’s compass: Design Legacy
*iron basket pendants: Bobo Intriguing Objects  *carnival chick: Design Legacy

READ MORE

  • Tell Your Friends

As you know, teal is our October Color of the Month. Many of you agreed it is the perfect color for fall, and I have to say, I happily agree. I was all about mustard-yellow going into October, but I think I’ve found a new favorite color. My nails are painted a glossy shade of teal. I recently picked up a deep teal dress. And now I think I can finally say goodbye to summer without too much separation anxiety, all thanks to my new best friend. The hue instantly struck a vintage chord in my mind. Retro teal electrics, hand-blown glass and mid-century modern kitchen wares. Check out some of my favorite vintage teal finds.

Entertaining with the Color of the Month: Let’s Talk Teal

HGTV Color of the Month October Teal Colors Etsy Accessories Teal Trending Color HGTV Design Blog Design HappensAll from ETSY: 1. Vintage Avon Fish Cologne Bottle :: FunVintageLiving  2. Vintage Swingline Stapler :: WiseApple  3. Vintage Boston Champion Pencil Sharpener :: swagJUICE  4. Large Samsonite Biscayne Luggage :: theoldgoat  5. Retro Motorola Electric Clock :: BeatriceinBlue  6. Cathrinehom White and Teal Lotus Cooking Pan :: MidModMomStore  7. Nelson McCoy Vase :: alamodern  8. Mid-Century Modern Chair :: SocietyInc  9. Vintage China Dish :: vintagebitsandpieces  10. Vintage Ceramic Plates :: thecupcakekid

In what form would you most likely use teal in your home? Slathered across your walls in a shade from your favorite paint collection? In bold accents? A dose of vintage fun?

Tell us in the comments below.

  • Tell Your Friends

A few weekends ago, Ken and I took a break from decorating the new dining room to explore a few of our favorite local antique stores. There are still plenty of empty areas we’d love to fill in our home, and rather than buy new, we’re always fans of purchasing something with a bit of history.

Although we ultimately came home empty-handed, there were quite a few stunners we stumbled upon:

Antique Shopping- Erin Loechner

I may not know how to sew, but I can dream, yes?

Art is always a need in our home, and I’m continually switching out new pieces that rest on our art shelf. I fell hard for these vintage ads for dress patterns and sleeve detailing.

Antique Shopping- Erin Loechner

Oh, I would love to name each of these folks. I see a Harry and an Evelyn!

Along the same vein, antiqued photographs make for a really interesting collection in any space. I’ve always loved the idea of displaying photos of people I’ve never met. Call me crazy, but it’s a small reminder that even though our world is big, we’re sort of all connected in some small way.

Antique Shopping- Erin Loechner

Game time!

On a more functional note, antique games always make me smile. In this case, a wooden croquet set caught our eye not only for the perfectly aged condition of the game, but also for the rustic wooden box it came in. Two cool finds in one!

Antique Shopping- Erin Loechner

I feel like I need a child just so I can justify purchasing this toy.

Vintage typewriters are everywhere, but I’ve never seen a kid’s tin version in such a vibrant color as this one. Wouldn’t it be a lovely addition to a children’s room?

READ MORE

  • Tell Your Friends

As you can probably surmise from the content of most of my posts, I’m a big contemporary design fan – with a dash of rustic charm thrown in for good measure.

Jonathan Charles chest of drawers

However, antiques and vintage designs, while always somewhat popular, are making a huge push this season. You’re sure to see more and more Old World pieces like these neoclassical chests of drawers from Jonathan Charles. “Italian neoclassical design is a testament to innovative craftsmanship, something I wanted to reacquaint modern society with,” says CEO Jonathan Sowter. As soon as I saw these pieces, I thought of the possibilities of mixing them in with modern designs. The chest on the left just screams, “Use me as a television console!” to me (inspired no doubt by Emily Henderson’s recent makeover).

What do you think? Have you been seeing more antique or classical pieces in stores? Would you ever mix styles?

  • Tell Your Friends

Barb Blair, owner of Knack Studios in Greenville, SC, is known for her inspired “redeeming” of old furniture. I’m in love with her designs. And if I can’t be her, I at least want to own one of her pieces.

Barb names each of her works. This one is “berno,” my favorite because of the poppies and porcelain drawer pulls. If you don’t live near Greenville, don’t worry. Knack originals are for sale on Etsy, and Barb has the shipping down to a science.

Latest Pins on Pinterest

  • Flea Market Shopping Tips - HGTV Handmade

  • Mother’s Day Gift Guide: 15 Unique Gifts For #Mom

  • Mood Board Monday: Cherries

  • Sweet and Savory #Easter Recipes