ALL POSTS TAGGED "makeover"

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Let’s do this AA style: “Hello, my name is Camille and I’m addicted to buying old boxes.” (Well, and jewelry too but that’s another matter). Old boxes are a great decorative way to stash unattractive, everyday stuff in plain sight. For instance, I have a little cane-covered box filled with crafting essentials in my living room so if the crafting bug strikes while I’m watching TV, a project is within easy reach.

I particularly love old boxes with drawers so I couldn’t pass up this cutlery box (AKA silverware chest) at an estate sale recently for just 9 bucks. The box’s blond or maple finish was popular in the 50s and 60s so it’s safe to assume that it’s more than 50 years old. Personally, I’m not a big fan of mid-century blond finishes and this one was in particularly rough shape with lots of scratches, dings and a big water stain on the lid so refinishing it with a more traditional, darker stain was definitely on the menu. If the felt liner had been in better shape, I might have considered leaving it as-is but the fabric was dirty, picked and even worn through in places so I decided to re-line the box as well.

Here’s what I started with, it truly is massive, easily double the size of most dresser-top jewelry boxes:  Cutlery Box Before
And here is my new upcycled jewelry box, fully refinished and re-lined:
Silverware Chest That Has Been Turned Into a Jewelry Box
Read On To Learn How I Did It

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We’re all about sharing the insider info—when it’s a secret, it sounds so much more fun, right? So take a look at some of the coolest DIY projects, house tours and transformations we have on the pages of the latest issue of HGTV Magazine before it hits newsstands in exactly one week.

May cover

You could barely even tell there was a house on this lot before all the overgrown greenery was cleared. And if you think the exterior transformation is amazing, just wait until you see what’s inside.

fixer upper house

If you haven’t been brave enough to rummage through your attic, this sewing machine turned side table can act as your motivation.

sewing machine diy

This rainbow wall that reminds you of sunshine and warm weather and well, rainbows is not from a home by the ocean. Nope, you can find this and more tropical style in the suburbs.

rainbow wall

We hope you’re loving what we showed you, and now we’re hoping you’ll do the same. In the front of each issue is the You Showed Us section where you get to show off some amazing projects. If you find something in the May (or any other) issue that you just have to replicate, take pictures and send them to us at hgtvmagazine@hearst.com, and your handiwork could be featured in an upcoming issue. You can also send pics via Instagram using the hashtag #HGTVMagDIY.

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You know how you can live with something and think it’s great for years then one day you look at it and decide that it has to go — stat?! Well, that was me and the shower curtain in my guest bath. When I originally bought the Waverly “Norfolk Rose” shower curtain in 2007, I was going for a cozy cottage look and it fit the bill perfectly. Fast forward to 2014 and — while my taste is still traditional — my color preference has shifted to grays and blues and I like my patterns a little more graphic. Thus, the hunt for a new shower curtain commenced.

Here’s a peek of my guest bathroom before:
Cottage-Style Bathroom Before Makeover
See how I updated for less than $25

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If you’re a pet parent, like me, you know that you can never have enough storage. Leashes, food, treats, grooming supplies and most importantly — toys — take up a lot of space. My older pup, Madeline, long ago lost interest in stuffed animals but my 3-year-old Schnoodle, Sophie, believes a girl can never have too much stuff.

Initially, I spent big money in pet stores on adorable, interactive toys she would toss up in the air a few times then happily destroy. After several months of this, I stumbled across a big box of 25-cent stuffed animals at a yard sale and haven’t paid retail since. After a thorough cleaning in the washer (hot water with a few drops of bleach) and extended tumble in the dryer, Sophie’s second-hand victims (um…toys) are good as new.

To store her stash, I bought a large wicker trunk, painted it black, added a bronze crest I found (where else) at an estate sale, slid it under a table in the living room and used it to keep Sophie’s toys within easy reach. For years the trunk worked fine but this spring my ability to find bargain toys exceeded Sophie’s ability to destroy them. Luckily, I already had a thrifted basket on-hand that, with a little makeover, would be perfect for containing the overflow: 
Dog-Toy-Storage-Basket-Makeover-Before

The basket was too tall to slide under the side table so removing the handle was the first step and I wanted to give it an antique look (I envisioned an old fishing creel) so it would better blend in. Here’s how I did it:
Dog-Toy-Storage-Basket-Makeover-Step-by-StepSteps: 1-cut ties holding handle in place  2-remove handle  3-thoroughly coat basket with spray stain (I used 2 coats) 4-choose an embellishment, I decided to repurpose an old belt  5-cut off excess leather at the top and bottom  6-attach belt to top of basket using super glue then clamp in place  7-flip basket over and glue a thin piece of wood to the bottom (I just snapped the end off a wood shim)  8-secure belt to wood with thumbtacks or nailhead trim  9-add felt pads to the basket’s bottom to protect your floor

And, voila, my once-plain basket now looks like it belongs in a house filled with antiques:
Dog-Toy-Storage-Basket-Makeover-Before-and-After

Best of all: the easy-to-access toy basket gets the Sophie Seal of Approval. Buh-bye little buffalo, looks like the bell has tolled for thee:
Sophie With a New Stuffed Dog Toy

MORE ADVENTURES IN ANTIQUING:
Adventures in Antiquing: Clinch River Spring Antiques Fair
Adventures in Antiquing: Charleston Antiques Show Part 1
Adventures in Antiquing: Charleston Antiques Show Part 2
Adventures in Antiquing: (Easy!) Beachy Candle Makeover
Adventures in Antiquing: Repurposed Wooden Tray
Adventures in Antiquing: Crushing On Carrara Marble
Adventures in Antiquing: Old Toolbox Turned Magazine Caddy
Adventures in Antiquing: Old Clock Repurposed as a Frame
Adventures in Antiquing: Classical Busts
Adventures in Antiquing: Vintage Avon Bottle
Adventures in Antiquing: Salvaged Molding As Holiday Decor

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When it comes to making over a beach house on the cheap, my family doesn’t just get our hands dirty knocking down kitchen walls and turning a tiny closet into a beachy bookcase, we’re also all-in when it comes to filling the beach house with one-of-a-kind furnishings.

My 18-year-old nephew scored this solid cherry bedside table for a song at an estate sale last fall. It was quite literally falling apart so he used his charisma and law-school-bound negotiating skills to get the seller to throw it in (for free!) with the rest of our haul. After my dad replaced missing bits and stabilized it, this once shabby little nightstand was ready for a chic makeover:
Beachy Rustic Nightstand Before and After

My sister and I decided to paint it black but re-stain the top to match an antique chest-on-chest on the bedroom’s opposite wall. Even though the finish was pretty scuffed up, more sanding was necessary to provide “tooth” for the paint while an orbital sander made short work of completely stripping the top so it could be stained. Because I planned to distress the paint to highlight details and allow the cherry wood to show thru, one coat of black paint was all I needed:
Sanding and Painting Rustic Nightstand

Once the paint had fully dried, I used sand paper to give the table a time-worn, distressed look. The key to distressing is to concentrate sanding on areas that would have naturally seen the most wear, like any raised details, corners and along edges. Next, I brushed the top with an oil-based stain, then used a cotton rag to wipe the same stain over the remainder of the nightstand. The stain soaked into the distressed areas to create a more realistic time-worn look.
Sanding and Staining Rustic Nightstand

For less than $20 in materials, this little table (that was once destined for the trash) provides handy bedside storage and adds just the right cottage touch to the master bedroom. Finished Cottage-Style Nightstand*Three years later, the beach house is still a work in progress; keep checking back for more thrifty transformations.

MORE BEACH HOUSE MAKEOVERS:
Budget Beach Cottage: Make a Nautical Rope Mirror
Budget Beach Cottage Before and After: Built-In Bookcase
Budget Beach Cottage Before and After: Kitchen
Budget Beach Cottage Before and After: Living Room
Adventures in Antiquing: Easy Beachy Candle Update

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If you’ve read my antique posts then you know that I’m a big fan of finding new uses for old things – but I also believe in reworking a room’s architecture to better suit the way you live.

My sister’s beach house had a tiny closet filled with shelves in the main living room. How tiny you ask? So tiny that getting anything larger than a puzzle box into and out of it was a challenge. Initially, we had plenty of projects to keep us busy but once we had the kitchen and most of the painting covered, it was time to get creative!

Typically, “getting creative” in my family involves my Daddy’s excellent woodworking skills, a hastily sketched plan and lots of paint — and this time was no different. We decided to turn the mini closet into a built-in bookcase that would provide both decorative and hidden storage and fit in with our beach bungalow’s cottage charm. A weekend worth of work, @ $125 in materials and several trips to the hardware store later … voila, we’re all pretty proud of the finished project:   Beach House Built-In Before and After PhotosFirst, I should note that a closet is typically wider than its door – go ahead, peek inside a closet and you’ll see what I mean. In addition to the door’s framing, there’s usually a small amount of wall surrounding the framing. So even though the door was only 18 inches wide, the boxed-in recess of the closet was actually 24 inches wide.

We wanted to create as large of a built-in as possible so we first removed the door, molding and paneling above the closet then my dad used a jigsaw to cut away the few inches of paneling on either side of the door opening to fully open up the space. Next, we headed to the hardware store to find a stock kitchen cabinet to fit our opening and lumber to use as shelves and as a top for the base cabinet. You can see in the second image that the cabinet is just a little deeper than the opening but it doesn’t stick out so far that it’s obvious. Once everything had been primed, caulked and painted, it looked like a built-in that had always been part of the house’s architecture:Beach House Built-In Step-by-Step Photos

After the paint had dried, my sister and I set to work filling the shelves with our budget beachy finds. The cabinet’s drawer holds all our pups’ harnesses and leashes while the bottom door conceals a stack of rainy-day puzzles and games:Beach House Built-In After Photos*Three years later, the beach house is still a work in progress, keep checking back for more thrifty transformations.

MORE BEACH HOUSE MAKEOVERS:
Budget Beach Cottage Before and After: Kitchen
Budget Beach Cottage Before and After: Living Room
Adventures in Antiquing: Easy Beachy Candle Update

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Three years ago, my sister bought a rundown fishing cottage on the NC coast. While any beach house is certainly better than no beach house (I’m not complaining!), this particular cottage was in pretty bad shape. Check out more before-and-after photos here to see what I mean.

Before: Dark, mismatched and cramped, the kitchen was a mish-mash of colors and materials. The yellow cabinets were constructed with the house in the ’70s while the previous owners added a few white pre-fab cabinets (front left) in the ’80s for extra storage. In addition to being just plain ugly, the sheet vinyl flooring had definitely seen better days and was cracked and peeling up.  Dark, dated and dingy beach house before makeover

The yellow kitchen cabinets put up quite a fight, it took no less than 2 coats of primer and 4 (yes, 4!!) coats of white semigloss to make them over. Other than A LOT of paint, shelf liner and caulk, the cabinets stayed the same. If you look again at the before photo, you’ll notice we had a board cut at the hardware store to fill in a pointless empty space above the sink. For less than $10 for the brackets and board, we added a cute shelf that gives the cabinets the cottage look we wanted.

After: We briefly considered laying tile in the kitchen but decided to continue the wood flooring from the adjacent living room for better flow. Isn’t it amazing what a few gallons of paint (and A LOT of elbow grease) can do?!Paint works wonders to brighten up this beach house kitchen

Before: The fridge was tucked into an L-shaped wall that concealed it from the dining room on one side and the living room on the other. This also meant that the kitchen felt really cramped and wasn’t fully open to either room.Paint works wonders to brighten up this beach house kitchen

After: Moving the fridge and water line to the opposite wall allowed us to entirely remove the wall between the kitchen and dining room and turn the wall separating the kitchen and living room into a small bar area. Bonus: Moving the water line meant my brother could plumb in the dishwasher so we no longer need to roll it over to the sink to run a load of dirty dishes (which was a serious pain in the butt).
Paint works wonders to brighten up this beach house kitchen

After: Here’s another view showing how open the kitchen is now to the dining and living rooms after we removed the partial walls. The column conceals a necessary steel support so it stayed, my dad boxed it in with leftover paneling and trim to make it a design feature. A thrifted brass bell (just $3) lets everyone know when it’s dinnertime.
Removing walls opens up this sunny beach house kitchen

*Three years later, the beach house is still a work in progress, keep checking back for more thrifty transformations.

MORE BEACH HOUSE MAKEOVERS:
Adventures in Antiquing: Easy Beachy Candle Update
Budget Beach Cottage Before and After: Living Room

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My sister bought a fixer-upper beach house almost two years ago which we’ve slowly but surely been hammering back into shape. In addition to a long list of structural changes, we needed to find a house full of beachy furniture and accessories on the cheap. I hail from a family of bargain hunters/diy-ers so the beach house has been a fun challenge for us.

Before: We started in the main living area which was dark, crowded and just plain sad. Sunny yellow trim did nothing to brighten up the driftwood gray paneling. Unfortunately, you can’t see the pitiful greenish-gold shag carpet which, thanks to leaking windows, had mildewed and actually smelled worse than it looked (hard to believe, I know). Dark, dated and dingy beach house living room before makeover

See the Afters

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If there’s one thing my frequent estate/garage sale forays has taught me,  it’s that no one need ever pay full price for a candle. Ten bucks for a pillar candle? What?! I can’t remember the last time I shelled out more than $1 for one. The only downside to purchasing secondhand candles is that they’re often dented, scratched or are a color that won’t work with your decor. No worries, a little hot glue and twine will cover up a world of sins.

I recently picked up some bargain candles at an estate sale in Knoxville before heading down to my sister’s work-in-progress beach house. I had some jute twine and furniture webbing left over from other projects so I decided to give these 3 thrifted candles a quick beachy makeover — et voila:  coastal twine-wrapped candles

Pretty, huh? I paid $2 for the 3 candles and, as I said, all the other materials I already had on hand — but, if I had to buy them, this would be a $10-$15 project.  They fit right in with our other beachy bargains:coastal twine-wrapped candles

I know people will ask about fire safety for obvious reasons — twine and upholstery webbing are flammable. First, as with any candle, you shouldn’t leave it burning without supervision — but — I’ve done variations of this project (covering pillar candles in paper, ribbon, bark and even paint) many times and never had a problem. The key is to choose a pillar candle wide enough that the wick burns down the center leaving a wax shell. Don’t try this technique on a narrow pillar or taper candle.

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In the March issue of O, Oprah is discussing making over her California home. Ms. Winfrey feels her Santa Barbara house doesn’t accurately reflect her style or who she really is — and so, she’s getting to work with designer Rose Tarlow to come up with a more “lived in” look (or, as I like to call it — “less stuffy.”)

These photos are Oprah’s “Before” shots. If she plans on improving these rooms (they look pretty good to me!), I can’t wait to see the final results.

Oprah's Home Makeover

I’m a sucker for bookshelves. And, wow — these are spectacular! I believe Oprah is changing them, though.

Oprah's Home Makeover

The goal for this room will be to create an elegant and sophisticated space, but allow for warmth and playfulness. I guess it doesn’t do that, already?

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Organization is my middle name (well, that and Elizabeth), so I can’t tell you how thrilled I am to share our latest video – a closet makeover! Ken’s been hard at work building a custom closet solution that we designed for our master suite, and you guys? It turned out beautifully. Take a look…

What do you think, friends? It’s a vast improvement, that’s for sure. And if you’re inspired to try the look in your own home, feel free to ask any specific construction questions in the comment section; I’ll be popping in to answer any and all!

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Laundry room makeovers might not seem like a high priority for most homeowners, but for me? Huge. I am completely, madly and deeply obsessed with doing laundry. It’s by far my favorite chore (although I’m pretty partial to loading/unloading dishwashers, too), and living with a half-finished, semi-cluttered laundry room has definitely put a damper in the joy I usually glean from this chore.

And with the momentum we gained from last week’s DIY vanity project (do you love it as much as I do?!), Ken and I decided it was time we bit the bullet and finished the last remaining items on our laundry to do list. Might I add that this means our renovation checklist for the laundry room is 100% complete? What a feeling!

In case you don’t remember what the space looked like in the very beginning, let me remind you photographically (you’ll want to wash your hands after seeing this image; trust me!):

Laundry Room Makeover Before & After - Erin Loechner

The super gross before photo!

Scary, right? Of course, wood-paneling the walls made a huge difference, and just a few short months ago, the space looked like this:

Laundry Room Makeover Before & After - Erin Loechner

An in-progress shot of our cluttered laundry room.


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Remember last year when I returned home from San Francisco to a newly unearthed fireplace? It’s been nearly twelve months, but we finally finished the room! I’ve got a feeling you’re going to love our new Swedish dining space:

A few notes about the space:
1. You may or may not recall our former faux grandfather clock decal. After we lived with the clock for a few months, we realized that although we love our sweet decal, it was far too Victorian for the rest of our home. You win some, you lose some. In this case, we had to lose the decal to win our new DIY plywood clock. I’d say we came out on top!
2. We chose a FLOR rug design* (this one!) because we installed FLOR carpet tiles in the rest of our home and they’re the easiest things to clean in the entire world. Perfect for a dining / entertaining area and an accident prone female (read: me).
3. That super modern pendant you probably fell in love with in the video? You can score your own at Iacoli & McAllister. I highly, highly recommend.

As always, I’ll be hanging out in the comment section if you’re wondering where we purchased anything else! See you next week!

DISCLAIMER: The custom rug shown in the above video was provided to me by FLOR for review purposes only. I was not paid to promote or endorse this product and all thoughts and ideas are truthful and reflect my opinion alone.

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You remember our laundry room, right? The second scariest room in our entire home? (Don’t worry, you’ll see the first – our sunroom – next month!)

Laundry Room Makeover- Erin Loechner

Still in progress, but a vast improvement.

Well. I’m pleased to announce that our laundry room is no longer scary. Not even a bit. And in case you need a visual reminder, here’s the before, photographed last winter:

Laundry Room Makeover- Erin Loechner

The frightening before...

…and a progress shot, photographed today:

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Living spaces are so difficult for me to decorate, as it’s really hard to find the right combination of completely comfortable, quiet and calming yet still relatively inspiring. Fortunately, Ken and I nailed it with our recent makeover. I think you’re going to be very, very pleased!:

What do you think? Could you live in a monochromatic living room? How do you like finished design compared to my mood board? And who wants to guess how old that TV is?

Tell me in the comments below.

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Ah. The first episode of my brand spankin new show, Secrets From a Stylist. (The launch is saturday at 9pm. 1 day and counting, geez. And the official title of my first episode?… Hollywood Regency Meets Country Club). It’s like the first day of high school. I remember it like it was yesterday, but I feel like I’ve grown up a lot already by the second semester, er 10th episode. The first week EVERYBODY was trying to figure out their roles; what were our strengths, weaknesses, and the general crazy timing of it all. And don’t forget while i’m styling and hosting each episode, i’m still working on the next four to six designs, so i was having a blast, but was kinda also doing the first week of training for the mental olympics, well my version of it anyway. But the first week, like freshman year, was full of excitement, anxiety and total madness. And it all begins with the style diagnostic…..

Me, Hillary and Bobby

So Here’s a Secret

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We’ve got a juicy sneak peek of the first makeover from Design Star winner Emily Henderson’s new series, Secrets From a Stylist, premiering on Saturday, February 26 at 9p/8c.

Emily’s also been putting her design know-how to work helping readers discover their personal style. Upload photos and videos of items that represent your personality for the chance to have Emily diagnose your design style.

Isn’t that couch bonkers?

And here’s your invite for our Twitter party during the show!

The details:
Live Twitter Party with Emily Henderson (@em_henderson) during Secrets from a Stylist Premiere
Sat, 2/26 from 9-9:30pm ET
Hashtag: #HGTV

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Like many cooks, I fantasize about a bigger, better, prettier kitchen.

blue tile kitchen

Design*Sponge showcased a kitchen makeover recently that had two items which will now be added to my kitchen fantasy file: blue tiles and a copper hanging lamp. I’ve never seen a lamp like this one, but it creates such a lovely visual reference to copper cookware. And what a perfect color compliment to the tile work. Nicely done!

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Visit the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service website, and you’ll see this: “Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘What are you doing for others?” Each year, Americans across the country answer that question by coming together on the King Holiday to serve their neighbors and communities.” In researching this post, I learned about some awesome ways those with a passion for interior design or crafts are volunteering their skills and talents to make a difference in other people’s lives. I share two of them with you.

  • Bhutanese Kudzu Basket Project – Atlanta: A call to help Bhutanese refugees, victims of ethnic cleansing new to the Atlanta area, led to a repurposing of “the vine that ate the South.” With the support of volunteers, the refugees have been empowered to harvest kudzu growing near their apartment complexes, use traditional techniques to weave baskets and sell them at local shops, festivals and farmer’s markets. That’s how I learned about the Bhutanese Refugee Support Group Atlanta. The work of these refugee artisans help pay for rent and other essentials. I hope they open an Etsy shop someday!

  • Blissful Bedrooms – NYC: NPR recently reported about this nonprofit “committed to transforming the bedrooms of young people living with disabilities.” These stellar bedroom makeovers are all the work of volunteers. And the transformations make a tremendous difference in the lives of these differently-abled young people who are frequently confined to their bedrooms. The reveals when they first enter their new Blissful Bedrooms are joyful times a zillion!

Do you felt toy animals for an orphanage or knit blankets for a domestic violence shelter? Have you donated your interior design talents to renovate a chapel or your handiness with tools to help winterize a senior citizen’s home?

Let us know. We’d love to hear from you on this MLK Day.

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