ALL POSTS TAGGED "vintage"

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The HGTV.com team recently visited High Point Furniture Market to rub elbows with the design world’s movers-and-shakers and take the pulse of what’s to come. After several days of (blissful!) interior design saturation, I can tell you beyond a shadow of a doubt that antiques are HOT! Think mid-day-sun-baking-asphalt-in-the-middle-of-the-Mojave-desert hot. To capitalize on the trend, most showrooms had a curated, collected-over-time look that mixed their newly-manufactured products with a few vintage-inspired pieces.

Traditional furniture and accessories have always been a Market mainstay. Reproductions of everything from heavily ornamented Louis XVI settees to pale Gustavian commodes have never really gone out of style; but at this Market they were joined by the real deal: centuries-old case goods, lighting, classical sculpture, architectural salvage and quirky, one-of-a-kind accessories.

Here are just a few of the goodies I spied at Market; unfortunately, most of these gems are available only to the trade so I couldn’t include links — hit local antique shops or online sites like V&M, 1stdibs or Ruby Lane to search for similar items.

Antiques at High Point Furniture Market*burled wood chest: Luisana Designs  *early American ship’s compass: Design Legacy
*iron basket pendants: Bobo Intriguing Objects  *carnival chick: Design Legacy

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This vintage storefront greenhouse comes complete with reclaimed windows, wood flooring and a wood back wall. Each window is latched with a barrel bolt and the windows all have box supports to hold them open for ventilation.

Greenhouse

Etsy User :: Schuan Carpenter

Each greenhouse is unique. Designs are not finalized until materials have been procured. The final design is based on what materials are available at the time of purchase.

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As I’ve mentioned before: I love antiques but, in particular, my heart skips a beat when I see European antiques — French finds in particular. Years ago, I discovered a gilt Rococo-inspired wall clock at a flea market.  The clock face looked to be from the ’60s but the surrounding frame was hand-carved wood with applied gold leaf and appeared to be much older. At the time, I lived in Los Angeles and really had no use for it so it languished, forgotten, in my parents’ North Carolina basement for a decade until I rediscovered it. And, let me tell you, it was a very happy reunion indeed. I had recently purchased a round needlepoint of violets at an estate sale without a frame. Once I popped out the ’60s clock, I thought the Rococo frame and sweet, little needlepoint would make a happy pair.

And so they did: needlework in an old clock frame

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One rule I follow when thrifting is to see a find for what it can be not what it is. Take this antique drawer I found at an estate sale. It was at the bottom of a scrap wood pile in a stuffed-to-the-gills garage. The home’s previous owner had been a never-throw-away-anything-you-may-someday-need type and had seen the potential usefulness of a small drawer that had long since been separated from it’s original piece of furniture.

What sold me is its runner-less construction. Runners are the wood or metal glides that help a drawer to smoothly slide in and out; without them a drawer is just a shallow box. I was on the lookout for a small tray that could do double duty serving food and drinks at parties and was big enough to neatly store magazines on my coffee table the rest of the time – I thought I could make this drawer work. The bottom was flimsy due to water damage so I added a plywood board to strengthen it then tacked on quarter-round trim to disguise my fix and handles on each end so it could really function as a tray. 

Antique drawer repurposed as a tray

This project was a bargain costing me less than 10 bucks -- $3 for the drawer + another $6 for the handles which are actually gate pulls rather than drawer pulls. The quarter-round trim and stain I already had on hand.

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Today marks the opening of the 2012 London Olympics, and I don’t know about you, but I have Olympic fever. Feeding my obsession? This collection of vintage Olympic posters. Personally, I am charmed by this lady fencer in the Paris 1900 poster, but if I had to pick a favorite, I’d go with this dizzying example from the 1968 Mexico Olympics.

1968 Olympics Mexico Poster

Designed by artist Lance Wyman, this poster marries traditional Aztec design with  go-go ’60′s pop art. How about you? Do you have a favorite Olympic logo? Will you be watching the Opening Ceremonies tonight? I’ll be on the couch, popcorn in hand, waiting for that torch to enter the arena.

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I love antiques. My home is filled with them. I’ll admit that’s partly out of bargain-hunting necessity but mainly because, in many ways, I feel that antiques are better — better construction, better lines, better attention to detail — just better. They have a character, charm and history that new and mass-produced can’t match.  

Take this winsome little vase. I discovered her at a rural flea market this spring covered in decades of grime. The milk glass color and classic Greco/Roman shape drew me in while the $1 price tag sealed the deal. Honestly, I didn’t recognize it as an Avon bottle until I’d cleaned her up enough to make out the label.

Avon perfume bottle filled with gardenias

My vintage Avon "Grecian Pitcher" originally held bath oil when sold in the '70s, now it's my go-to vase for short-stemmed flowers like gardenias.

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Growing up, my mother, grandmother, aunt — everyone in the family had matching dinnerware in their kitchen cupboards. Everything was super matchy-matchy and super boring-boring.

I’ll admit — I’ve regrettably fallen into the same ho-hum pattern. Those all-in-one dinnerware boxes are so darn convenient! But, I’ve been on a mission to break my family’s tradition of boring. It’s time.

I’m determined to buy all sorts of vintage plates to add variety in the kitchen. The varying colors are stunning, the looks are so different from anything in today’s mass market and let’s face it — they’re just plain pretty. The juxtaposition of styles takes me to a happy place.

This display of plates found at houzz.com is the exact look I’m shooting for. Come on, even if you’re not an antique/vintage-style lover, you have to admit that there’s something appealing about this colorful presentation.

Vintage Plates

What’s your take? Do you prefer dinnerware that matches, or are you interested in going rogue like me?

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Not only is June a popular month for weddings, in my opinion, there’s never been a better time to be a bride.

There’s no shortage of DIY wedding ideas for crafty, budget-conscious brides. As a Pinterest lurker, my favorite wedding trend is the rustic-chic look, but who said brides should have all the fun?

Leah McCall, creative director and owner of Whimsical Gatherings, shared a few of her favorite arrangements and tablescapes that can be crafted for any event.

For something old and something new, Leah used vintage spice tins with fresh flowers encased in a glass cloche. The floral arrangement was made with Mimi Eden garden roses, Dusty Miller ornamental plants, Queen Anne’s lace, and tuberose. To create a memorable conversation piece for a family reunion or dinner party, incorporate your heirlooms into the table decor.

Bring personal heirlooms and treasures to the table, like this vintage floral arrangement by Whimsical Gatherings.

Photo by Dixie Pixel Photography

Need more space for guests or a buffet? This DIY table made with saw horses and barn wood is an easy, inexpensive solution. Leah wrapped cotton and thistle around the chandelier she found at a flea market. Candles and flowers give the party a rustic-elegant theme that can form the backdrop to either a formal or casual affair.

This DIY wedding table is perfect for a rustic-chic party theme. Designed by Whimsical Gatherings

Photo by Dixie Pixel Photography

Decorating with fresh blooms is ideal for a summer garden party, but pricey. Rather than large centerpieces, create several small arrangements. If you don’t have enough containers, craft your own. Along with her collection of small white vases, Leah created vessels with tin cans wrapped in kraft paper and lace, adorned with Midori silk ribbon and antique brooches. For this tablescape, she used Coral Charm Peonies, Dusty Miller and scabiosa pods.

DIY tablescape that can be mimicked for a rustic-chic party theme, by Whimsical Gatherings

Photo by Dixie Pixel Photography

If you’re working with a limited supply of blooms, this bridal bouquet is proof you don’t need flowers for a vintage-chic arrangement. Leah created this masterpiece with cotton and brooches.

Whimsical Gatherings created this cotton and brooch bouquet for the bride wearing a southern-style wedding dress. It can be copied for a flowerless arrangement at any party.

Photo by Dixie Pixel Photography

You don’t need flowers or a wedding gown to craft an elegant party. Let the blissful look of nuptial DIY trends inspire your next event.

Photos by Dixie Pixel Photography

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I’m sure some of you grew up RVing in a 1950s Shasta camper during the summer months. Well, now your neighborhood birds can camp in the same style. Etsy shop owner jumahl created this birdhouse using retro turquoise accents and corrugated aluminum. Aside from its design aesthetic, the aluminum door is a squirrel deterrent so the birds can eat in peace. I love all the details — including the curved awning, wheels and trailer hitch.

 Vintage Trailer Birdhouse

Now if you could only teach the birds how to make S’mores and sing popular camping songs — that would be a sight to see!

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I’m not a mother yet, but I’m already taking notes about great products for tots, so I’ll be all set on the nursery decor front when that day comes. (In the meantime, my friends get to benefit from my research at their baby showers.) One company I’m loving right now is Aunt Bucky, for their perfectly funky crib and twin bedding, not to mention their quilts, apparel and decor.

aunt bucky bedding

I have an annoying compulsion to match everything, so I always appreciate when a design has done a bit of the pattern mixing work for me. Aunt Bucky’s stuff has an eclectic feel to it, as though it was cobbled together from leftover vintage fabric scraps, but the color palettes keep it cohesive. I’ve bookmarked the site, but I secretly hope Aunt Bucky will branch out into dog beds soon so I can have a bit of their flair in my place before I even get preggers.

[Via: the boo and the boy]

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